Project Factsheet
Tools for » National Development Capacities for Improving Employment and Self-Employment Opportunities for Young People
Project ID:00067214Description:MDGF-1941-H-NIC Natl Devt Capa
Fund:
MDG Achievement Fund
Start Date *: 31 Dec 2008
Theme:
MDGF Youth Employ & Migrant
End Date*: 31 Mar 2013
Country: Nicaragua Project Status: Financially Closed
  Participating Organization:   Multiple
About

Overview:

The main objective of the Joint Programme (JP) was to support national efforts for the identification, development and implementation of measures to improve young persons’ access to decent work, with a focus on vulnerable populations in both urban and rural areas, thus helping to prevent the negative effects of migration.  It sought to do this by improving the balance between labor supply and demand, supporting new or already existing cooperatives and microenterprises, and by strengthening national capacities for managing youth employment and migration. 

The programme brought focus on the challenges faced by youth while promoting a holistic approach to capacity building at all levels, from the municipality to national level. While promoting new skills and pathways for youth integration into the labor market. 

Ten municipal youth employment “round-tables” were created, (and one National Youth Employment Committee was formed in Managua) as spaces for tripartite dialogue involving employers, public sector workers and youth organizations. Due to their success, 44 additional round tables were installed with government funds in municipalities outside the JP leading to a total of 55 municipal round tables.

Under Outcomes 1 and 2 of the JP introduced 4,823 young people aged 15 to 24 into a learning pathway. Workshops included those to improve social skills; increased self-awareness; and to help build, strengthen and promote more positive attitudes. The JP also promoted more specific vocational training courses tailored to market needs for both employment and self-employment. These courses were designed based on Training Needs and Employment Outlook Diagnostics previously conducted in each municipality.

Some graduates of the vocational training courses received additional training on entrepreneurship in order to form youth enterprises and cooperatives. As part of this process, they were also provided access to financing through a revolving fund, created by the JP, as well as technical support and seed capital to implement their business initiatives, thereby ensuring their incorporation into the labor market after the training. The rest were integrated into different activities such as unpaid placements which contributed to their training and towards job placement in companies and public institutions. The latter was undertaken under Outcome 3 of the JP, which sought to help strengthen national capacities in youth employment and migration. These actions were taken to promote development of local and national processes of promoting decent youth employment, as well as awareness and training for officials and the general public on issues around youth migration.  An additional 38,000 young people were given access to  Training and Information Centers (CICA).

As part of the strategy for sustainability, the program helped formulate and approve the National Plan for Employment and Decent Work for Youth in Nicaragua 2012 -2016, which was incorporated into the medium-term budgetary framework of the central government as well as the new National Human Development Plan 2012-2016 as part of public policy for the youth of Nicaragua.

172 government officials from the Directorate General of Immigration were trained on  treatment of young migrants.

 

Outcome 1:

Improved balance between supply and demand for youth labor in the 11 selected municipalities.

 

Outcome Achievements:

  • Direct support was provided to 4,823 youths were trained in social skills workshops using a previously developed methodology. The social skills training allowed the young men/women to reflect and build on their natural skills.
  • 2,328 youths were trained in vocational training courses using methodologies adapted to the profile of the young participants and consistent with the economic dynamics of each municipality.
  • 10 municipal youth employment “round-tables” were created, (and one National Youth Employment Committee was formed in Managua) as spaces for tripartite dialogue involving employers, public sector workers and youth organizations.
  • Seven municipal ordinances relating to the overall development of youth, thus enabling a better environment for local public policies for the promotion of youth employment.
  • A communications plan was developed and implemented with participation of young people for radio and television media to disseminate the JP’s actions. Eleven community forums on labor rights with the participation of more than a 1,000 young people were conducted, as well as business meetings to promote the use of youth labor.
  • 38,153 young people (15,930 men and 22,223 women) had access to 863 training courses in various topics through the Training and Information Centers (CICA). 7,846 advisory forums, 59 film events, the granting of 4,781 training scholarships, and training in national and foreign institutions (Cuba, Mexico, Taiwan and Venezuela).
  • The Public Employment Service (SEPEM) was strengthened providing  employment opportunities to  1,397 young people at national level.

 

Outcome 2:

Young people’s micro cooperatives and microenterprises created and/or reinforced in the 11 selected municipalities.

 

Outcome Achievements:

  • Capacity building of 1036 youth in entrepreneurship, 160 of these young people (96 men and 64 women) received specialized training in cooperatives. Rural areas and women were given priority.
  • Establishment and implementation of a credit policy for the administration of the revolving fund (Banco Produzcamos) adapted to the characteristics of young entrepreneurs to facilitate their access to money, tools and supplies.
  • The JP provided support to 310 microenterprises that benefitted a total of 1,036 youths, these 11 cooperatives were financed benefitting 160 enterprises.
  • All small and medium enterprises created and supported by the JP received ongoing technical support in the form of: 1) assistance in the formulation of business plans, feasibility studies and improvement plans as well as the installation of the business, 2) basic management, marketing and administrative courses, 3) Specialized technical assistance to improve production processes.

 

Outcome 3:

National employment and youth migration capacities strengthened.

 

Outcome Achievements:

  • The program helped formulate and approve the National Plan for Employment and Decent Work for Youth in Nicaragua 2012 -2016, which was incorporated into the medium-term budgetary framework of the central government as well as the new National Human Development Plan 2012-2016 as part of public policy for the youth of Nicaragua.
  • For its inclusion in the medium-term budgetary framework, 80 public servants were trained on the content and strategic indicators.
  • As part of the process of awareness raising, a postgraduate diploma was organized and implemented at the National Autonomous University of Nicaragua (UNAN) on "Youth, Realities and Challenges." It was attended by 23 young leaders and 4 Program department coordinators, as well as 18 central government officials, 2 officials from UN Agencies, a union representatives and a representative of the private sector.
  • An analysis on juvenile migration trends was performed using administrative records from the previous five years.
  • Designed and implemented an information campaign on the rights of young migrants and risks of youth migration under the slogan "Where I go, also go my rights." The main focus was human trafficking and administrative requirements for migration. Youth assemblies were held in the 11 municipalities to discuss these subjects.
  • 172 government officials from the Directorate General of Immigration, enriched knowledge about the treatment of young migrants.

 

Best Practices:

  • 10 municipal youth employment “round-tables” were created as spaces for tripartite dialogue involving employers, public sector workers and youth organizations. Forty-four additional tables were installed with government funds in municipalities outside the JP leading to a total of 55 municipal tables.
  • Promotion and use of volunteer networks to support work at municipality level.
  • Promotion of personal development through the Social Skills workshops.
  • Adaptation of the curriculum offer to address existing demand previously identified.
  • Entrepreneurship as part of a comprehensive training methodology which allowed young people access to the labor market while developing leadership.
  • Creation of financial products for youth with flexibility and seed capital as an incentive for entrepreneurship.
  • The JP promoted an integrated inter-agency response through the inclusion of various Government and UN agencies.
  • The Program developed strategies for capacity building at all levels, from Municipal to National level.
  • The various work placements contributed to the institutionalization of government institutions working with the youth of Nicaragua. Through these experiences many institutions incorporated the theme of Youth to their work plans.
  • Decision-making through consensus through the coordinating body evidenced a common vision around youth which facilitated the implementation and success of the program in technical and administrative terms.

 

Lessons Learned:

  • It is important to establish reachable targets according to  Agencies and institutions capacities.
  • In programs involving the inclusion of socially disadvantaged young people, the development of social skills component is both relevant and key for success of the programme. However, it is necessary to make this component permanent throughout the life of the program, and to include not just the individual, but also the family and the environment (the community).
  • Geographic dispersion, particularly in rural areas, limits ability to monitor and proves challenging for logistics. While using youth-to-youth monitoring proved effective and innovative, monitoring at all levels would have been easier if the distances had been closer.
  • The organization of networks of local volunteers is a privileged setting for personal growth, social development and construction of citizenship for young people, and helps optimize resources, to establish more efficient communication, both to bottom and vice versa. These networks can provide sustainability to these processes.
  • Such programs cannot be designed quickly. The complexity of the joint processes requires an extra degree of strategic thinking and special attention for operational processes. Moreover, by virtue of being joint, they require a high degree of consensus in the design and wider than regular consultation programs.
  • Special consideration should be given to the municipalities. While clarity at a national level is key for guidance, good connection with the local level together with close monitoring and support are essential for implementation.
  • The ownership and leadership of local officials is key for sustainability and institutionalization of the intervention.
  • A communication and advocacy plan must be in place from the design phase with assigned resources for implementation during execution.
  • Monitoring and evaluation of a program is a key element to gain insight into the scope of products and goals. 

 

More details can be found in the documents below.

Recent Documents
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