Project Factsheet
Tools for » Niger Childhood, food security and nutrition Program
Project ID 00067243 Description MDGF-2010-I-NER
Fund
MDG Achievement Fund
Start Date *: 31 Mar 2009
Theme
MDGF SP-ChildFoodSec&Nutri
Project status Financially Closed
Country Niger Participating Organization   Multiple
About

Overview:

The joint program sought to contribute to the achievement of MDGs 1, 4 and 5 in the struggle against hunger, reducing child mortality and improving maternal health. The program reached over 52,000 pregnant women with antenatal care (ANC) and assisted about 8,500 deliveries. Nine thousand kits were distributed to pregnant women and over 36,000 contraceptives provided. Similarly, campaigns to promote vitamin A reached 89% of children targeted under 5 years and 82% of pregnant and lactating women. 

The nutritional education and behavior change communication campaign was performed, 85% of the 95 schools targeted received additional training materials and classes. Also, 60% of schools benefited from wells and water supply equipment and 75% of schools in the targeted areas were equipped with school gardens. 80% of schools received the essential learning package, which includes kitchens, stores, pallets, facilities for washing hands, canteens, latrines. In addition, nearly 20 health practitioners received training on management of nutrition and food security programs, and two teaching modules for health personnel, including students, were designed.

The JP’s capacity building activities have improved the quality of meals and increased the nutritional value while boosting new consumption patterns. Similarly, the introduction of the concepts of gardening and nutrition in the curriculum is expected to promote sustainable behavior change in nutrition. 

The JP promoted the establishment of a functional system for sustained advocacy for nutrition and food security. Several meetings were held with health authorities, as a result the National Nutrition Policy, the feeding strategy and Nutrition of the young child were developed. In addition, a budget line was included in the 2012 and 2013 budget to purchase therapeutic inputs.

 

Outcome 1:

Nutrition management continuum of care is put in place to reduce the prevalence of malnutrition among children under 5 years.

 

Outcome Achievements:

  • The program reached 52,558 pregnant women with antenatal care (ANC) and assisted 8,491 deliveries.
  • 9,000 kits were distributed to pregnant women and 36,630 contraceptives provided.

 

Outcome 2:

Food security and nutrition of households, particularly those with young children has improved.

 

Outcome Achievements:

Campaigns to promote vitamin A reached 89% of children under 5 years and 82% of pregnant and lactating women.

 

Outcome 3:

The Nutrition Education and Communication for Behavior Change (CCC) is introduced in schools.

 

Outcome Achievements:

  • The introduction of nutritional education and behavior change communication campaign on nutrition was performed.
  • 85% of the 95 schools targeted received additional training materials and classes on nutrition.
  • 60% of schools benefited from wells and water supply equipment.
  • 75% of schools targeted were equipped with school gardens.
  • 80% of schools received the essential learning package, including kitchens, stores, pallets, facilities for washing hands, canteens, latrines.

 

Outcome 4:

Management capacity of nutrition and food security programmes is strengthened.

 

Outcome Achievements:

  • 19 health practitioners received training on management of nutrition and food security programs.
  • Two teaching modules for health personnel,  including students, were designed.

 

Outcome 5:

A functional system for advocacy at different levels regarding nutrition and food security is established.

 

Outcome Achievements:

  • The JP promoted the establishment of a functional system for sustained advocacy for nutrition and food security. As a result the National Nutrition Policy, the feeding strategy and Nutrition of the young child were developed.
  • Plumpy nut, F-100 and F-75 were included in the essential drug list of Niger.
  • A budget line was included in the 2012 and 2013 budget to purchase therapeutic inputs.

 

Best practices:

  • Capacity building of beneficiaries was at the heart of the sustainability strategy. Particular emphasis was placed throughout the programme implementation on learning and knowledge transfer.
  • Targeting schools, for various forms of support (toilets, shops, canteens, JPS, improving training curricula) was very effective and considered a good practice.
  • Training of communities, teachers and students in gardening techniques and knowledge on nutritional value of products to improve quality of food intake.
  • The introduction of the concepts of gardening and nutrition in the school curriculum (life science, geography, history).
  • School gardens were innovative in that they favored; i) increased food diversification within schools for a better quality of learning; ii) provided access to income for the schools; iii) initiated children and teachers in gardening techniques.
  • The empowerment of people for the care and supervision of community gardens against wandering animals.
  • The use of products from the gardens in the preparation of school meals which allowed for better nutritional quality.

 

Lessons learned:

  • Some problems could have been avoided at the design stage, such as inter- agencies budget allocations; the need for extensive awareness campaigns and outreach to promote ownership at all levels; a simple mechanism for general supervision and management.
  • Community ownership the key to ensuring results are effective at the local level.
  • The schemes for the creation of community gardens, implemented in a cooperative manner and based on clearly stated criteria, ensures commitment from all stakeholders
  • Capacity building among community partners allows the transfer of responsibility for certain JP activities. 

 

More details can be found in the documents below.

Recent Documents
Key Figures
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Contacts

If you have questions about this programme you may wish to contact the RC office in Niger or the lead agency for the programme. The MPTF Office Portfolio Manager (or Country Director with Delegation of Authority) for this programme:

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