Project Factsheet
Tools for » Strengthening the ability to define and apply water and sanitation policies
Project ID 00067201 Description MDGF-1910-A-PRY Strength water
Fund
MDG Achievement Fund
Start Date *: 31 Dec 2008
Theme
MDGF Economic Governance
Project status Financially Closed
Country Paraguay Participating Organization   Multiple
About

Overview:

The JP sought to reorganize the drinking water and sanitation sector by strengthening institutional capacity and working with civil society. It sought to prioritize some actions toward indigenous peoples and dispersed rural communities.

The JP proposed policy guidelines and a national plan for Drinking Water and the Sanitation Sector for dispersed rural and indigenous communities in addition to proposals for changes to the legal framework and to administrative procedures, with a focus on local recruitment and intensive use of local labor. As a result of these efforts savings of up to 400% were achieved.  Tools were developed to strengthen management of water and sanitation (WASH) such as training manuals and dynamic Information water systems as well as methodological tools for risk mapping and development of action plans for four communities, or the systematisation of the different models and technologies used water and sanitation in the country. Legal mechanisms and financial instruments for long term infrastructure investment were also systematized.

A training plan for local fundraising was developed and implemented with local governments, together with a community outreach plan promoting awareness on the right to water and sanitation. 

Adaptation of the Government’s program “Improve Your Construction Business” to the water and sanitation sector through the development of guidelines and training of trainers. In addition, extensive capacity building efforts took place under outcome 4 including training on: labor intensive public investment; basic life skill training; implementation and maintenance of water infrastructure; construction and management of water purification systems.

 

Outcome 1:

Gender sensitive capacities strengthened for the provision of quality drinking water and sanitation.

 

Outcome Achievements:

  • First Rapid Assessment of Water Quality Systems and shallow wells undertaken and published.
  • Developed and validated a common questionnaire for the water and sanitation sector for use by the different institutions of the sector in surveys and censuses.
  • A National Survey on Water and Sanitation (WASH) was undertaken for Indigenous Communities.
  • The JP published an Updated Analysis on Drinking Water and Sanitation (2010) as well as the report on meeting the MDG goals.
  • The JP supported the installation of dynamic Information water systems in 3 departments as a tool for the management of WASH programs at departmental, municipal and Central level.
  • The JP proposed policy guidelines and a national plan for Drinking Water and the Sanitation Sector for dispersed rural and indigenous communities in addition to proposals for changes to the legal framework and to administrative procedures, with a focus on local recruitment and intensive use of local labor.
  • Training manuals in water and sanitation management were developed and implemented for government officials and 24 staff trained as trainers in water and sanitation programme management.
  • Programme and training manuals developed for Drainage Boards. 14 120 boards and 14 Commissions trained.
  • The JP promoted models for innovative public-private partnerships.

 

Outcome 2:

Citizenship strengthened for the promotion and protection of their rights, participation in decision-making and control of public sector actions.

 

Outcome Achievements:

  • The JP undertook and published an analysis of the Indigenous Community Water and Sanitation Survey (2009) and an analysis of the National Survey on Water and Sanitation.
  • Users and providers of service quality survey on Water and Sanitation published.
  • Development of methodological tools for risk mapping and development of action plans for four communities.
  • Documentation of the different models and technologies used for water and sanitation in the country (2000-2010).
  •  A community communication plan on the right to water and sanitation was designed and implemented.

 

Outcome 3:

Medium and long term financing schemes of infrastructure in water services and sanitation designed and implemented.

 

Outcome Achievements:

  • Legal mechanisms and financial instruments for long term infrastructure investment were systematized.
  • A financial model for departmental and municipal governments was systematized.
  • A training plan for local fundraising was developed and implemented with local governments.

 

Outcome 4:

Access and quality of service delivery of water and sanitation in rural and indigenous communities within the country was improved.

 

Outcome Achievements:

  • Training of staff and delivery of equipment and supplies for the water quality control. A baseline was set up for 10 communities.
  • Adequate water and sanitation technologies for rural and indigenous communities in the departments of Boqueron and Caazapá developed and shared.
  • Adaptation of the Government’s program “Improve Your Construction Business” to the water and sanitation sector through the development of guidelines and training of trainers course.
  • Water supply systems constructed running in three rural communities and indigenous community Caazapá. Sanitation plans for 2 communities prepared and submitted for funding.
  • Water and sanitation systems running in six indigenous communities of the central Chaco.
  • Capacity building in rural communities included training for: 170 members of rural communities and 23 central government officials were trained on labor intensive public investment; 184 members of 16 indigenous and rural communities received training in: electricity, masonry, sheet metal, plumbing and carpentry; 4 rural communities trained for implementation and maintenance of water infrastructure; 6 indigenous communities received technical assistance and training for the construction and management a water purification system; 25 Health Workers were trained in water and sanitation management.

 

Best Practices:

  • The JP constitutes an effort to involve beneficiaries and a bottom-up approach instead of the traditional top-down approach. Significant progress was made in the design of this participatory model. The JP was successful in linking local NGOs with extensive experience in the field and hiring of local labor. Construction works with local recruitment reduced costs by 300 and 400%.
  • The JP constituted an effort to strengthen local governments in what is a highly centralized country. Local management processes were strengthened and equipment was provided.
  • Much of the success of the JP stems from a systematic approach to coordination through regular planning and coordination meetings, as well as joint action between two or more agencies in specific tasks.
  • The Programme Management Committee was established in the executive body with participation of key sector institutions. Its success was given by the richness of the discussions and reflections, strengthened by the firm intention to continue the interagency committee beyond the JP. The Programme Management Committee became a space for accountability, decision-making and discussion.
  • The JP generated a lot of quality documents for analysis and diagnosis of the situation of water and sanitation in Paraguay. Several participatory methodological tools, which took into consideration the socio-cultural characteristics of the beneficiaries, were also developed for use with rural and indigenous communities. Some of the materials were translated into local languages and included with indigenous drawings to promote better understanding and ownership. These tools have been fully validated and adopted by Government institutions at central and local level.
  • Under the exchange program, South-South cooperation was promoting international meetings with indigenous leaders and communities in other countries to share experiences and learning.

 

Lessons Learned:

  • Gender and multiculturalism remain weak within central and local government institutions responsible for the implementation of social projects. It is necessary to build specific tools to ensure their inclusion into programs and projects.
  • The JP should consider specific conditions and worldview of rural and indigenous communities as change processes require answers that are consistent with this context. Consultations from the diagnosis and design stage, in line with the 169 Convention 169, should be part of any government action with the communities. This is essential to ensure the sustainability.
  • It is imperative to ensure there is no exploitation (sexual or labor) stemming from any of the companies, consultants or NGOs contracted by the central government and local institutions for the provision of goods and services for the communities. 

 

More details can be found in the documents below.

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